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Old 12-01-2008, 10:46 PM
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Default Risk of MRSA?

Anybody know anything about MRSA? Keturah's speech therapist told me today that she got MRSA in her finger about 10 days ago. She has been on antibiotics and wiped everything down before session at school. She told me that it has been running rampant through the school where Keturah gets her services. She didn't tell me about the MRSA until after class, so I wasn't amused about that. Does anybody know how long it's contagious or if there is anything that makes you more susceptible to getting it? TIA
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Old 12-01-2008, 11:02 PM
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I don't know the answer to most of your questions (sorry!!) but both my ped and my DXH (who reads stuff from the CDC) told me to swab around the outside and edges of Shelby's nose with Polysporin (or other triple antibiotic salve) to help guard against MRSA and I guess other viruses. I've been doing it and it actually has helped a lot with Shelby's always green nose!

Hope
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Old 12-02-2008, 08:32 AM
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WOW I cant believe the school didn't notify you earlier. That is crazy. Here there was a report last year and one this year in a middle school and ALL the schools sent notes out.

From the handout they sent the one thing that makes you more likely to get it is a cut or other open wound on your body somewhere, which is why when my kids have the slightest paper cut they get a bandaid now. The handout recommended doing that too. It says you can get it by Touching the skin of another individual who is colonized with MRSA or has an active MRSA infection Breathing the tiny droplets that are expelled during breathing, coughing, or sneezing Touching a contaminated surface.


It also says
When a person becomes infected with MRSA the bacteria begin to multiply within the affected area. A person will not have any signs or symptoms during this time. After 1 to 10 days, on average, signs and/or symptoms of MRSA may appear. This period between MRSA transmission and the beginning of MRSA symptoms is called the "MRSA incubation period."


We have been realy careful with regards to MRSA, mainly because the one drug they treat it with vancomycin, is what Emma is highly allergic to. So that scares me a little.

If you are really worried i would contact Keturah's doctor and see what they recommend you do to help prevent her from getting it
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Old 12-02-2008, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
I don't know the answer to most of your questions (sorry!!) but both my ped and my DXH (who reads stuff from the CDC) told me to swab around the outside and edges of Shelby's nose with Polysporin (or other triple antibiotic salve) to help guard against MRSA and I guess other viruses. I've been doing it and it actually has helped a lot with Shelby's always green nose!
How would that work since she breathes through the trach? I don't think I should put any salve on her speaking valve.

Thanks Lori. My kids go to private school, but Keturah's services are through the public school since she isn't enrolled in school yet. I usually get phone calls in the evening that are automated about PTA mtgs etc that I just hang up on. I doubt they would give me a call about MRSA in the school, but I never get hand outs since we are only there twice a week for 30 min each. Thanks for sharing all the info though. I'm glad her teacher at least wiped her spot down.
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Old 12-02-2008, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by lovemymak View Post
How would that work since she breathes through the trach? I don't think I should put any salve on her speaking valve.
I guess I'm thinking, maybe wrongly, that the nose is still there and open to germs and things floating around, that is might not hurt to swab that area, just to be on the safe side. But no, I wouldn't put anything on her valve!

Hope
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Old 12-02-2008, 12:12 PM
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Um. Yeah. Ian and Griffin passed it back and forth for two years. Griff was actually hospitalized with an abcess on his head at 3 months. We know a thing or two. I should call you. Search this forum, there are several informative threads since I've been around.
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Old 12-02-2008, 01:16 PM
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There are several useful websites about MRSA. The most easy to understand was the Mayo Clinic's http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mrsa/DS00735. The CDC has information too.

Sahana was swabbed for MRSA after 4 months in the NICU, after a neighboring baby tested positive for it. She tested positive for colonization (i.e. hanging out without causing any harm) on her left arm-pit and on her nostrils. We were very concerned when we found out but quickly learned that MRSA colonization is very common in both hospital as well as community settings. Despite rigorous precautions, healthcare workers tend to be colonized as well.

Given the amount of time some of our children have spent (and spend) in hospital settings, it's almost inevitable that kids, and indeed their parents/caregivers, will get colonized at some point. In the community, it's not inconceivable that one could pick it from pushing a grocery cart. Most of us could be carrying it and not even know it.

Like most Ped. hospitals, our NICU and the Transition care facility, had a policy of placing such babies in contact isolation (gown and glove), not treating the colonization unless it turned active and not testing periodically to check for continued colonization. In other words, once colonized, assumed to be always colonized.

Most common strains of MRSA still respond to Vancomycin and a few others (I forget the names) but doctors don't like to use those "big guns" unless absolutely required, for fear of creating a strain that is resistant to even that.

What we took away from that experience was to continue taking normal precautions (hand-washing, wiping down, etc.) and to watch for symptoms such as boils, abscesses and even respiratory distress. Doctors will still treat each symptom on its own "merit". For example, after testing positive for MRSA colonization, Sahana developed an abscess on her head from an IV stick. the Neonatologist drained it and the drainage tested positive for methycillin sensitive staph and she was given the corresponding topical antibiotic. The wound was let to air-heal.

Harish
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Old 12-02-2008, 01:19 PM
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I got this information second hand but this is what I was told. There is a difference between hospital acquired MRSA and community acquired MRSA as well. From what I understand the CMRSA is more troublesome but not everyone has severe issues with it. Lots of handwashing, not touching wounds, not sharing things: you know the drill. I think that respiratory is usually the HMRSA and skin is the CMRSA. Karen
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Old 12-02-2008, 06:46 PM
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Default We are MRSA positive.

My daughter grew MRSA from her trach back in May. But since then all of her trach cultures were negative, so they swabbed the inside of her nose and found out that she is colonized with it, which means she's a carry of it. I heard that Bactroban works really well on the inside of the nose.
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:36 PM
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MRSA is really rampant in the community (as well as in hospitals) now, and, as much time as our kids (and we) spend in hospital/medical settings, many are probably colonized.

The good news is that the community aquired MRSA in the skin, etc, which is prob what the teacher had, is often responsive to antibiotics such as Clindamycin, Bactrim, Minocycline, etc. The 'big guns' Vancomycin (IV) or Linezolid (IV and oral) are usually reserved for more deep seated infection.

Again, the usual precautions- handwashing, wiping surfaces, avoid crowded closed in spaces, etc-- are key for prevention.

That being said, I would be PO'd that the therapist waited until after the session to inform you-- not like she didn't have time in the 10 days since she was diagnosed/treated. Keturah was probably not harmed at all, but I think that you should have been given the info and the choice to cancel the session.

Sebby
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